Challenge #5 Snow Sludge

Challenger: Ben

image

Snow Sludge:  After a beautiful snowfall everything is covered in a pure white blanket. But after a few days, when the weather starts to warm up that snow turns into a wet sludge mixed with all the grim and dirt of the city.  This photo was taken right out side my church in Brooklyn.  So Chase, where is God in this sludge?

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Challenge #04 Smog

Challenger: Chase

smog

Smog is a portmanteau of the words smoke and fog. The word was intended to refer to London’s pea soup fog. This smog is caused by burning large amounts of coal within a city and contains soot particulates from smoke, sulfur dioxide and other stuff. Modern smog is a type of air pollution derived from the emissions of internal combustion engines and industrial fumes that react in the atmosphere with sunlight to form secondary pollutants that also combine with the primary emissions to form photochemical smog. The atmospheric pollution levels of Los Angeles, Mexico City and other cities are increased by inversion that traps pollution close to the ground. It is usually highly toxic to humans and can cause severe sickness, shortened life or death. I wonder what post-modern smog will be like? -wikipedia

Who doesn’t love a portmanteau? Bonne chance, Benjamin!

Challenge #03 Gastroenteritis

The Challenger: Ben

Gastroenteritis_viruses

Alright, Chase, here’s one based on recent personal experience, and during which I could have used some serious prayers: Gastroenteritis or infectious diarrhea is a medical condition characterized by inflammation (“-itis”) of the gastrointestinal tract that involves both the stomach (“gastro”-) and the small intestine (“entero”-), resulting in some combination of diarrheavomiting, and abdominal pain and cramping.[1]Gastroenteritis has also been referred to as gastro, stomach bug, and stomach virus. Although unrelated to influenza, it has also been called stomach flu and gastric flu.

Challenge #02 The Blobfish

The Challenger: Chase

blobfish

The Blobfish is a deep-sea fish that inhabits the coastal waters of Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand. Typically shorter than 30 cm, they live at depths between 600 and 1,200 m (2,000 and 3,900 ft) where the pressure is several dozen times higher than at sea level, which would likely make gas bladders inefficient for maintaining buoyancy. Instead, the flesh of the Blobfish is primarily a gelatinous mass with a density slightly less than water; this allows the fish to float above the sea floor without expending energy on swimming. Its relative lack of muscle is not a disadvantage as it primarily swallows edible matter that floats in front of it such as deep-ocean crustaceans. Due to its low density flesh, the Blobfish’s shape is very different when it is out of water.

Ahh! Jabba-the-fish! Good luck Benjamin, I’ll pray for you as you try to pray with this!

Challenge #01 The Phorid Fly

The Challenger: Ben

The Mysterious Theologian: Chase

The Phorid Fly. Don’t let this benign image fool you!  The Phorid Fly’s most endearing characteristic is that some “species reproduce by laying eggs in the thorax of the ant. The first instar larvae migrate to the head. The larvae develop by feeding on the hemolymph, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue in the head. Eventually, the larvae completely devour the ant’s brain, causing it to do nothing but wander aimlessly for approximately two weeks. After about two to four weeks, they cause the ant’s head to fall off by releasing an enzyme that dissolves the membrane attaching the ant’s head to its body. The fly pupates in the detached head capsule, requiring a further two weeks before emerging.” –Wikipedia.

Have fun, Chase!
Look for Chase’s response on Ash Wednesday.